The busy spring real estate market is in full swing.

The busy spring real estate market is in full swing. Buying a home, whether it is your first or where you will retire, is an exciting time. What will your design style be? Where will you live? These are all important things to consider. Inspections are an important part of the home buying process. But do you think about pests? This type of inspection is usually done toward the end of the process. As a buyer or seller, would you freak out if the inspector said you have termites, carpenter bees or worse, rats?

A pest inspection is a crucial step when buying or selling a home, and in maintaining the home you may already own. Pest inspectors typically search for insects that cause wood damage, but they might also look for pests that can be a threat or nuisance in general. Many people never give a second thought to pest inspections until a problem arises, or until they are buying or selling a home.

It is an ugly truth that most homes have some sort of pest issues. If you are selling your home, spend the extra money upfront to get a pest inspection. It is always best to get ahead of these things and not be surprised. Pests can affect your home inside and out and can cause a lot of damage.

Common concerns that can plague homeowners and homebuyers alike include determining who pays for an inspection, who to hire, and how to exterminate any pests that are discovered. The cost and labor of having your home inspected is well-worth the peace of mind you will have in knowing you have prevented structural damages down the road, or a disruption in the home-buying process.

Many pests, including termites, are practically invisible. Often, the damage they do to a home remains unseen until it is severe, potentially causing structural damage. Hire the professional inspector trained to determine what pests may be invading your home.

Professional inspectors are thorough in searching for signs of infestation. They will examine both the interior and exterior of a house, including foundations, areas around windows and rooflines, and rafters. If they find a soft spot or other signs of infestation, they use a specialized probing device to poke a hole in the wood. This is a normal part of an inspection and should not upset homeowners. If an inspector can easily poke a hole in the wood, that simply serves as evidence of a far greater problem.

Pest reports identify areas of concern and list a pest company’s recommendations to cure any problems, including repairing decaying wood. If you are the buyer, you may be asking the seller to have the pest problem repaired prior to closing. If you are the seller, I recommend having this inspection done prior to listing the property. As a homeowner, it can save you in the long run if you keep up the maintenance in your home with quarterly inspections and treatments. I prefer to let the pests live outside and not in my home, so get that inspection done soon!

Don’t be a pest, just do good things!